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Good Night, Sleep Tight by Brian Evenson


 


 

About Good Night, Sleep Tight

 

“PERHAPS TOMORROW I WILL WAKE UP ANOTHER PERSON. PERHAPS TOMORROW I WILL WAKE UP NOT A PERSON AT ALL.”

From the “master of literary horror” (GQ) comes a collection of new stories tracing the limits and consequences of artificial intelligence and “post-human” relationships. Populated by twins stepping into worlds of absence, bears who lick their cubs into creation, and artificial beings haunted by their less-than-human nature, each page sketches a world where our all-too-real feelings of isolation and ecological dread take on an otherworldly tinge.

In Good Night, Sleep Tight, Brian Evenson deftly weaves ethical dilemmas, maternal warmth, and echoes of apocalypse into his most tender, disquieting book yet.

 

 

Praise for Good Night, Sleep Tight

 

“Within these pages: boundless imagery and virtuosic range. Evenson seems to have sequenced the stories like he would the songs of an album: thematic handoffs that become echoes, one tone harmonizing with another. While Good Night, Sleep Tight harbors moments of legitimate terror, it’s Evenson’s powers of emotional observation that will make you gasp. And the unmatched artistry with which he renders them. This book is more than a gem: it’s a collection of precious stones.”
—Josh Malerman, New York Times bestselling author of Bird Box

“Brian Evenson’s new collection, Good Night, Sleep Tight, is nineteen installments of idiosyncratic, weird genius. I can’t think of a better practitioner of the short story at work today.”
—Jeffrey Ford, Edgar Award winning author of The Girl in the Glass

“Peeling back the thin veil that separates our humanity from the incomprehensible and the decadently weird, Brian Evenson crafts a masterful and utterly beguiling collection of literary unease with Good Night, Sleep Tight. With a pervasive sense of isolation and existential worry leaking from story to story, this disturbing collection proves why Evenson remains the undisputed master of short literary horror fiction.”
—Eric LaRocca, author of Things Have Gotten Worse Since We Last Spoke

 

 

Praise for Brian Evenson

 

 

Winner of the 2020 World Fantasy Award for best collection
Winner of the 2019 Shirley Jackson Award for a single-author collection
Winner of the 2005 International Horror Guild Award

“His stories are deeply terrifying and so troubling that they linger in your mind long after you’ve read them.”
—R.L. Stine

“Brian Evenson is one of my favorite living horror writers.”
—Carmen Maria Machado

“There is not a more intense, prolific, or apocalyptic writer of fiction in America than Brian Evenson.”
—George Saunders

“Like with Borges or Kafka, every one of Brian Evenson’s stories are a whole world distilled down to a few pages, and rendered in a pointillism that feels not just abstract, but cosmic, yet is gritty all the same, and leaves a distinct, bloody residue in your mind, in your heart. And then you can no longer look at the world the way you used to.”
—Stephen Graham Jones

“Evenson is one of our best living writers—regardless of genre.”
—NPR

“Evenson’s fiction is equal parts obsessive, experimental, and violent. It can be soul-shaking.”
—The New Yorker

“A master of literary horror.”
—GQ

 


 

 

Review

 

The uncanny and disquietness and yet very human emotion running parallel with vivid visceral masterful evocation with the reader carrying on the dreams and nightmares.

The author a capable conductor of the familiar and unfamiliar, executing with intimate and precision storytelling, juxtapositioning the reader amidst different realms and worlds with a myriad of characters consuming hypnotically under his wings within visionary works, enter The Brian Evenson Zone!

Greyness
Games
Help me
Things be controlled
People being instructed.
Help help
Paralysed character
A freedom wanted
Head and bodies and memories
Memories feed, knowledge gained
Scary bedtime story time
Servants and masters
Mother and father
Brother and sister
Twins
Family and unfamiliar
Frailties and complexities
Existential crisis
Fears and hopes
Need and wants
Strange and uncanny
Vivid and visceral
Insidiously consuming
First person narrations
Terrifying good.
Goodnight, sleep tight!

 

The Sequence

The first short story in collection with twin sisters, children playing a game, one will have hard time undoing and erasing its workings, the strange and uncanny awaits with vivid visceral telling.
Feelings stirred reminiscent to that of The White People by Arthur Machen.
An unsettling tale that has you amidst many things beyond the visible world there will be clapping and a sequence, twins sisters in tandem amongst the greyness with dreamlike sense of place something insidiously consuming.

 

Cabin

Scene is set, it’s snow mountain a one Beck out from camp equipped with rifle inspecting traps tension building and sense of imminent danger vivid, a darkness approaching with safety paramount, a cabin ? queue the ominous music, the orchestrator Brian Evenson will transport you and make you feel.
The reader amidst two worlds, the familiar and the unfamiliar, hypnotically taken along the journey with just the balance of word usage a reader needs.

 

The Rider

You have empathy for the man in this tale broken down on road side in search for aid and recovery, we all been there, in need of a human and a phone.
Then there is the case of stepping into terrain of something not quite as it should be wrong place, wrong time.
There be a town void of denizens, one weird and strange, except for a man and a boy and with visceral and unnerving effectiveness a passage of reading shall be induced.

 

 

A True Friend

A very short piece on the dilemma of one in isolation, paralysed, with echoes of help, and a clamp in the back of the head.

 

 

Annex

Machine and keeper and the unfamiliar.
It tells you on its relationship with the keeper ‘creatures of blood and meat and bone’ and discovery of the meaning of Annex and other things heads, the otherness and its world and experience and as advice for others like it.
A well crafted memorable tale that may ruminate within the reader and serve as a dire warning to certain dilemmas with new worlds that may come.

 

 

The Thickening

One character tells of a dilemma of sorts and expounds on the frailty and complexities of it.
Oh dear one tells of a thickening and it’s terrible indeed. Awaken awaken!
Always have company in the darkness of night, it helps, and so too to our teller of this tale. I hope the reader doesn’t have to go through a thickening like what is explained within this tale.
Goodnight, sleep tight!
Terrifying good.

 

 

Mother

A tale that starts with telling of one with no choice, brother and sister of a kind and a mother in control, drawn to a path every morning are two.
There are truths and lies and there be discoveries in its environment off the path and learnings of new things and memories.
There are heads, bodies, and memories that can be swapped.
With new knowledge from the memories comes new understandings and fates.
Another fine strange new world the author takes you.

 

 

Good Night, Sleep Tight

Goodnight bedtime stories told by parents, in this tale by a mother, and now in the future the narrator with a son, will history repeat itself?Scary stories told at night and memories of them plaguing one protagonists soul.

 

 

Vigil in the Inner Room

There is another mother in this tale, and a father, two siblings Gauri and Gylvi, and an inner room with a door sealed with wax, a vigil and pray for a dead father, there be darkness and a want to understand facts, good strangeness awaits.

 

 

Imagine A Forest

On a voyage aboard a vessel one young and at a crèche amongst children feeling different, it has a dilemma and an existential crisis of sorts perplexing its system.
There be a mother and a knowledge bank aiding in the seeking of answers and the deciphering of facts in a whole new world where many are encased within the tubes and sleepers. Told in first person an artificial being stating of facts for the record, ones on a mother, and matters learnt and things occurring, there be life or death in the balance on the vessel.

 

 

Maternity

A nurse working in the hospital on maternity ward and a baby goes missing.
A case of the bay snatcher and one coming to terms with this fact of having baby and losing.

 

 

The Night Archer

There be a story told with a night archer.
The boy, the girl, brother and sister, father and mother, and a tragedy afoot in a home.

 

 

Servitude

New worlds and people seeking preservation, breeding and safety, amidst vessels and anabiotic chambers. Nuances of being a servant amongst the rich, the masters, with the lower and higher classes, the state of affairs with an earth left behind, justices and injustices, all expounded upon.

 

 

Solution

The earth is dying and an ability to survive fading.
To adapt and survivor the future there be unethical research, test subjects and transformations in the search for a cure.
The seeking of a solution to the tragic fate humanity had been lead down by the denizens of the earth of paramount importance to one man a husband and father.
What measures will he take to achieve this solution?
An immersive potent terrifying tale on a certain fate of humanity.

 


 

About Brian Evenson

 

Brian Evenson is the recipient of three O. Henry Prizes and has been a finalist for the Edgar Award, the Shirley Jackson Award, and the World Fantasy Award. He is also the winner of the International Horror Guild Award and the American Library Association’s award for Best Horror Novel, and his work has been named in Time Out New York’s top books.